2014 ANTIQUUM VINEYARD PINOT NOIR - $65

 There are typical ripening patterns for Pinot noir clones in the Willamette Valley– early-ripening Wadensvil comes first, the Dijon clones are next, California heritage clones are interspersed, Pommard follows, and late-ripening Wadensvil is last.

 But Pinot noir is a fickle animal that does not fall easily to understanding.

At Antiquum Vineyard, Dijon 777, Pommard and Wadensvil ripen simultaneously, while Dijon 667 and 115 are the last to come off the vine. The combination of high elevation, large diurnal shifts, and Bellpine soil (a mix of undersea lava flow with overlays of marine sediments) at Antiquum fundamentally alters what we think we know about our cherished grape variety. Add to the odd ripening cycle a flavor profile fully exhibited through fermentation and elevage that is reminiscent of white peaches, passion fruit, and guava, and a wine emerges fully outside the normal boundaries and profiles of the variety. It is confounding.

 So what to do?

 Subdue the character? Blend it away? Ignore it and hope it goes away?

 Or instead capture it. Shepherd the wine into a place where it can most fully be itself, the thing it was farmed so intensively and intently to be. Blend a final wine that screams its place, no matter how odd, different, and ‘other’ it is. Purposively get out of the way and into terroir.

 So that’s what we did, once again.

115 Cases produced

$65/bottle

$65.00In Stock
There are typical ripening patterns for Pinot noir clones in the Willamette Valley– early-ripening Wadensvil comes first, the Dijon clones are next, California heritage clones are interspersed, Pommard follows, and late-ripening Wadensvil is last.  But Pinot noir is a fickle animal that does not fall easily to understanding. At Antiquum Vineyard, Dijon 777, Pommard and Wadensvil ...
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